Washington Post & MORE

Today in The Washington Post. Review of my solo exhibition "Witnesses" at House of Sweden in Washington DC written by Mark Jenkins. On display until March 11, 2018.

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I am reaching out to share a unique opportunity for women in the DC area. Vital Voices Global Partnership will be hosting the annual Global Mentoring Walk in Washington, D.C.  on March 10th at the House of Sweden at 8:30 – 11:00am. As members of DC’s professional network of women, we believe that this is a perfect opportunity for you and members of your community to empower women leaders at all levels.

 The Global Mentoring Walks convene established and emerging women leaders to walk together in their communities around the world every year. As they walk, each established leader guides, advises and supports an emerging leader as they discuss personal and professional challenges and triumphs. Held on the same day in countries around the world in celebration of International Women’s Day, the Global Mentoring Walks are a movement for women’s empowerment through paying it forward and knowledge sharing. Hosted this year at the House of Sweden, featured speakers will include the Swedish Ambassador, Ambassador Karin Olofsdotter and esteemed artist, Anna U Davis.

 We are still accepting participants to serve as both mentees and mentors! Mentors are women leaders who are established in their industry and looking to give back and help the next generation of women leaders reach their full potential. Mentees are emerging women leaders who are in the early stages of her career, ideally between the ages of 15 and 25. Those who are interested can sign up here: https://www.vitalvoices.org/dc-registration/

 We would greatly appreciate it if you would share this opportunity with the women in your community. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us at mentoringwalk@vitalvoices.org.

 

 

 

 

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Anna U. Davis, Untitled, 2017, mixed media on cut‐out birch plywood, 34 1⁄2 x 36 inches. Courtesy of Galerie Myrtis 

Galerie Myrtis

Anna U. Davis

Damsels in Distress Black Edge Wall Sculpture

April 14 – June 9, 2018 Opening Reception Saturday, April 14, 4:00 – 6:00 pm

alerie Myrtis is pleased to present its first solo exhibition by graphic mixed‐media artist Anna U. Davis. In “Damsels in Distress – Black Edge Wall Sculptures” Davis critically examines issues of sexual harassment and gender inequality. By combing black and white ink, and acrylic paint to contoured birch plywood, Davis creates sculptural figures that explore misogynistic behavior and investigates the physical and emotional impact through her personal lens.

The opening reception will be held on Saturday, April 14, from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. The exhibit runs from April 14th through June 9th. Visit website for programming information. www.GalerieMyrtis.net

Anna U. Davis states, “We only see the top of the iceberg. What lurks beneath, are stereotypes highly steeped in tradition, culture and religious beliefs. These stereotypes are holding women back from reaching their full potential. It will take all of us to change this pattern. Men have to take action, instead of sitting on the sidelines and accepting the sexist behavior that occurs in daily interactions. Men need to speak up and show by example their disapproval of these attitudes. Women should empower each other and not undermine each other. We are not enemies, even though I have witnessed the repeated interaction between women that reinforce the very things that keep us down. Women are so often portrayed and treated as victims in need of rescuing, hence the title of the show “Damsels in Distress.”

The works exhibited investigates these issues and draws from my personal beliefs and experiences. From the girl who grew up in Sweden to the woman living her life in the United States, I grew up believing that I could become whatever I dreamed of and I was lucky to have encouraging parents and live in a progressive city in Sweden. Sweden is, after all, a country which is number five on the list of most gender equal countries in the world. Regardless of those circumstances, Swedish society was not without inequality and sexist views. Girls and boys are indoctrinated from an early age with gender expectations. Girls are supposed to act in a certain way; be pretty, accommodating and nurturing. They are the designated caretakers, while boys are taught to be strong, aggressive, and bold. They are the providers and the protectors. Why is it that when girls show qualities which resemble the characteristics of a leader, they are called “bossy,” the word is used as a negative connotation; while boys exhibiting the same characteristics are praised for their determination and leadership skills. Attitudes have to change, amongst both men and women. If we can't do that, this vicious circle will never be broken. 

The idea behind the construction of the work in “Damsels in Distress,” originated from transforming my grey “Frocasian” (an amalgam of Afro and Caucasian) characters of my mixed media paintings into starkly black and white drawings, exploring my subject matter primarily through line and form. These black and white drawings became the inspiration for the development of the wall sculptures exhibited in “Damsels in Distress.” called “Black Edge.” The “Black Edge” sculptures are constructed with black and white ink, and acrylic paint applied onto cut‐out birch plywood, and it's contour defined by its black painted edges. These plywood sculptures immersed from the idea of deconstructing the common support medium structure, the rectangle. By separating the figures from the picture plane and installing their cut‐out shapes slightly away from the wall, you are left with a more fluid creation, which breaks away from traditional structure and form.”

For additional information on this exhibition, please contact the gallery at (410) 235‐3711 or

info@galeriemyrtis.com 

GALERIE MYRTIS
2224 North Charles Street * Baltimore, MD 21218 410.235-3711 * GalerieMyrtis.net 

 

 

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Anna U. Davis, Sad Girl, 2017, mixed media on cut‐out birch plywood, 43 x 43 1⁄2 inches. Courtesy of Galerie Myrtis